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. this is overnight videotape from the u.s. navy, a u.s. coalition launching two nights of punishing air attacks targeting mommar gadhafi's forces, b52 bombers, jet fighters, more than 120 tom hawk cruise missiles, scattering progovernment forces on the ground in libya, the long time leader vowing a long war ahead. good morning, everybody. we've got it all covered for you. what a way to start a weefnlgt i'm bill hemmer, welcome to "america's newsroom". good morning to you martha. martha: good morning, bill. i am martha maccallum. an international air assault, all but crippling libya's air defenses, that according to the u.s. military. listen to this: >> there has been no new air activity by the regime and we have de tented no radar emissions from the defense sites targeted and there has been a significant decrease in the use of all libyan air surveillance radar which is most of those appear to be limited now only to the areas around tripoli and surt. we are not ruling out strikes against valid targets when and if the need arises. martha: there you have it, u.s., british and french planes blastin
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
to do with china and are essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are on track. >> host: it's almost as if there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west, your story of the rise of the east and the lines are going to cross. >> guest: i think this is you can argue there's an absolute part for short talking about the west and its isolation and issues going out there and going in an amazing time and other european economies have done the unthinkable moving hundreds of millions of people out of poverty so this is going to naturally be able to question as well. >> host: let's talk about what is going wrong in the west. >> guest: first of all its important that in terms of the context of my work i talk about the unintended consequences, things that sound like a good intentions but actually yield bad outcomes and what i have done is to focus on the three key ingredients economists focus on as the drivers of economic growth and there is a capital that is basically money, labor that is the work force and then
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
that have nothing to do with china and essential to get right to make sure the u.s. and european countries are back on track. >> host: it's like a couple different books in one book. there's the story of the decline of the west, the rise of the east, and the basic premise of the lines are going to cross. >> guest: you can argue there's an absolute part for sure talking about the west in isolation and what the issues are going on there, and then, of course, we live in an amazing time of china and other emerging economies have done the unthinkable, moving hundreds of thousands of people out of poverty. of course, that's answering the ire relative question as well which is what i've done in the book. >> host: let's start by talking about what's going wrong in the west. >> guest: sure. first of all, i think it's really important in terms of context of my work, entalk about unintended consequences, good intentions, but yields bad outcomes. what i've done in the book is focus on the three key ingredients. those are capital, basically money, labor, which is basically the work force, and then fina
is set to have broadband speeds 200 times faster than the u.s. average. go to our website for more questions and answers. thanks to all of you for being part of my program this week. and i will see you next week. >>> your child gets into college. now the hard part -- how do you pay for it? we'll help you track down the money this hour. >>> and in these tough times, you might need to update your resumÉ. we've got some do's and don't's in the 4:00 p.m. eastern hour. >>> and 5:00, thousands of women take on walmart in a sex discrimination suit. it could be the most important case the u.s. supreme court hears this term. you're in the cnn news room, i'm fredricka witfield. >>> on the international front, rebel forces in libya say they are controlling two more key towns in their advance to tripoli. this is smoke hanging over the city of ras laneuf that where an opposition spokesman tells cnn government troops have pulled out of ports. both places were claimed by pro gadhafi forces at the start of the civil war. the next major city is moammar gadhafi's home town. rebel forces anticipate
in u.s. history a fact not lost on those here at the pumps. the price affects everything from flying to fruits and veggies. how much is that hurting you? >> it's really bad. it's really bad, probably about $75 to $80 to fill this up oar are our country uses 400 million gallons of gas a day. >> right now it's an easy $4. that's already there in california. wouldn't be surprised to see a this get closer to $5. >> reporter: that doesn't sit well here in baltimore. >> it's troubling. it does not stop me from driving around because necessity overweighs the cost of the gas and you just have to make it work. >> reporter: at the pump there's acceptance. they stay it will go to $5. >> that's fine. >> reporter: california is the worst. the mountain states the best. maryland is somewhere in the middle. >> got to go to work. got to pick my kids up. got to do what i got to do. >> reporter: the u.s. government has a strategic gasoline reserve of three quarters of a billion gallons of gas. jess, back to you . >> the last time that reserve was tapped, prices went down 25 cents. >> we're learning mor
nuke chenuclear plantse availablize ie izstabilizing. >>> we begin in libya. u.s. says coalition air strikes have established a no fly zone in the east soon to be extendeded to tripoli. richard engel, they say the operation went as well as could be expected. but there are a lot of questions remaining about whether we'll be able to turn this command over to whom and the opposition. how much do we though about the opposition in wlib qua and how do you distinguish between rebel forces and civilians? >> reporter: it's difficult to distinguish from rebel forces and civilians because the rebels until a few days ago or a few weeks ago were mostly civilians and they don't have a cheer leadership, they don't have uniforms. they don't have marked vehicles. and a lot of them are very undisciplined and up frofrnfo l unprofessional. they were trying to see how extensive the air and missile strikes were yesterday. today we were just out with rebel, watching them get into pickup trucks and head toward the front lines. we were watching rebels head to an area where they believe they have liberated m
sure the u.s. and european countries are on the right track. >> host: is almost like there's a couple of different books in one book. there is your story of the decline of the west. the rise of the east, and i guess the basic premise is that the lines are going to cross. >> you can argue that there is an absolute part talking about the west and its isolation and with the issues are going on there and of course we live in an easing time when china and the other emerging economies have done the unthinkable moving these people of poverty so it is going to be in the year relevant question as well which is what i have done in the book. >> let's start by talking about what is going on in the west. >> guest: sure. i think it's important that in terms of the context of my work i talked about the unintended consequences, things that seemingly undersurface from the good intention but actually yield bad outcomes and what i've done in this book is to focus on the three key ingredients that economists focus on as the drivers of economic growth and those are capital which is basically money. lieber
a crew member of the u.s. fighter that crashed in libya. defense secretary gates testified at a congressional hearing. gates said he does not think the u.s. should arm those rebels. >> in terms of providing that training, in terms of providing assistance to them, frankly there are many countries that can do that. that's not a unique capability for the united states. and as far as i'm concerned, somebody else should do that. >> libya's foreign minister has defected to britain. musa kusa one of gadhafi's closest aides. he is suspects of masterminding the bombing of pan am flight 103 that killed 270 people. nbc news pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski joins me now. nato officially took control of the entire military mission in libya but the headline is about the cia operatives on the ground and what they are doing there. what can you tell juice u.s. military and intelligence officials say if they didn't, if the obama administration did not have cia operatives on the ground, this operation was not well thought out and would be in trouble. this is pretty much preforma in thi
general wesley clark. after that i discussion on the state of u.s. public education. >> i am a numbers guy. >> as a visual op-ed columnist for "in york times," charlie blow uses trawls and brett -- charts and graphs i do not decide that will talk about a subject and look for the data. i search for that that person see if there is something interesting and that agrees with an opinion that i have or sometimes what surprises me and what surprised by readers. >> sunday night it 8:00 on c- span. >> no reporter's roundtable on the role of nato in libya. from "washington journal," this is 55 minutes. scully is with "national journal" and we have missy ryan -- pentagon reporter. how significant is it that nato will step up and take the lead? guest: it is an important step but not everything the obama administration wanted. what they have done it is often rise nato countries to enforce the no-fly zone but that is only the first part of the u.n. security council resolution. what the nato countries did not do is authorize the full mandate, which is all necessary means required to protect civilians.
-fly zone. >> as doug luzader shows us now, the white house is trying to dial back the u.s. involvement in the mission. >> reporter: the u.s. plans to step back now from the primary leadership role in this libian operation just as the international consensus may be fraying: a reinvigorate the option in libya and a path way of a destruction of what remained of gadhafi forces that were closed in on a rebel stronghold. the pounding from u.s. and coalition forces has begun to subside. the emphasis is on locking down the air space over the libian capital. >> with the growing capabilities of the coalition, i anticipate the no-fly zone will soon extend to drega and misratta and then to tripoli. >> reporter: and some countries are questioning how this will play out. the bomb and missile attacks have gone beyond taking out anti-aircraft batteries. and while the president has not altered his latin american tour schedule, while in chile he did make clear that u.s. will soon play more of a background role. >> let me emphasize that we anticipate this transition to take place in a matter of days and
from south korea. u.s. military ships are delivering food and relief supplies and a british rescue team is scheduled to arrive on sunday with heavy lifting equipment and 150 rescue experts and search dogs from virginia and california are on their way to japan to help right now. >>> a few people have tested positive for radiation exposure according to a report on japanese public television. they were near a nuclear facility when something inside the plant exploded shortly after the earthquake. government officials say the reactor itself was not damaged. >>> and hawaii is moving to get federal funds to help rebuild in the aftermath of the tsunami. it struck the hawaiian islands early yesterday morning, sweeping maui's coast with six-foot waves, causing millions of dollars in damage. and hawaii's governor signed a state of disaster proclamation today. >>> and in california, governor jerry brown has declared a state of emergency in four counties. in crescent city, waves topped eight feet. in northern california, one man was killed when he was swept out to sea while taking pictures of the ts
of terrorism after the u.s. drops 40 missiles and tomahawk cruise missiles targets sites. >> steve: joining us from the site where that plane was shot down yesterday, rick, do we know, whose plane was that and who did shoot it down? >> reporter: we can confirm now who that plane belonged to. we believe we're the only network have located the fighter jet that shot down out of the skies of benghazi, yesterday morning. behind me is the engine of that jet, the wings, char pieces remains and the photographer was rolling on the jet that was hit by anti-aircraft fire and crashed into that area on the southern edge of the city and what we're hearing from locals is that they believe the pilot, who was an opposition fighter as opposed to gaddafi directed this wounded jet into this area that's unpopulated and old adoption home. and the pilot put the jet here and we know that the pilot had a family and ejected far too late and we found the harness from his ejecting seat out of the seat itself and to clear up confusion we found a tail section of the jet pointed with the old royal jet and the new flag for t
] [inaudible conversations] >>> top officials from the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told senators today that the damaged nuclear power plant in japan, quote come continues to further stabilize, and that there have been no radiation readings in the u.s. the might be of concern. these remarks came before the meeting of the senate energy and natural resources committee. other speakers included officials from the energy department, the nuclear energy institute and the union of concerned scientists. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> thank you for being here. this is a briefing. this is not a hearing has such. the reason we try to it as a briefing is so that people wouldn't have to file written testimony 72 hours ahead of time and all of that and things are changing very quickly with regard to the evolving situation that the nuclear power plant. will the committee doesn't have direct oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants we do have to consider how events such as those affect the ability of the nation's nuclear fleet of 104 reactors to supply electricity, this of course the 104 react
: secretary of defense robert gates from over the weekend saying libya is not an imminent threat to the u.s. but the director saying the u.s. clearly has an interest there. is that good enough? chuck nash, sir, good morning to you. there was a lot said over the weekend, some view it as conflicts statements, others say no, this gives us greater clarification. take robert gates. what do you make of his comment? >> i think he was spot on. this is not in critical national interest for the united states, however, we do have interests in the region with tunisia on one side and ejit on the other side. bill: hillary clinton said something i thought was a little more -- i thought it was revealing. she said there was no perfect option and i think everybody that looks at this, yeah, that's right, hopefully that's why you took military action. hopefully we'll have a clarification continue. -- tonight. are they split or on the same side? >> i think there was u animinity before this was launched and secretary of state clinton said something else on another network. after isn't gates said no, it's not in
chris lawrence with a look at what role the u.s. might play in the no-fly zone. chris, live at the pentagon, what's on deck for the u.s. now that the un has passed this? >> ali, the u.s. air force has a base in italy, the navy has two, and the italians have already okayed the use of their area to launch some of the missions in this know fly zone. there was an aircraft carrier in the mediterranean sea near libya. it left earlier this week and is now out in the arabian sea. without a carrier, planes will have to fly possibly farther, which means they won't be able to spend as much time over libyan aerospace which means you may need more planes to carry out the mission. some of the officials i've spoken with here in the pentagon say don't just think of a no-fly as american fighter pilots flying american jets. there are other ways in which the u.s. can contribute. unmanned drones, for instance. the u.s. also has signal-jamming aircraft that could disrupt colonel gadhafi's ability to communicate with his forces. overall what you'll have to do is have a very clear line of command
at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. while this committee does not have oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants, we do have to consider how events such as those at fukushima affected the ability of our nation's nuclear freedom, 104 reactors, to supply electricity. of course, these 104 reactors currently account for about 20% of the electricity that we use and what the future of nuclear energy will be as part of our nation's energy banks. events at fukushima are changing by the our. they are serious, and we are watching those events unfold on the other side of the world. our knowledge at best is incomplete. as we look forward to these experts and forming a committee on what they see at the plant, how would impact our nation must existing fleet of reactors, and answer questions the committee members might have. before i introduce our two -- our first panel, we have four witnesses, two on this first panel and two on the second trip before i introduced the panel, let me call on senator murkowski for comment. >> let me welcome those who are presenting today. i appreciate the time is
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
to the west. >>> training accident. a jet engine explodes and catches fire aboard a u.s. aircraft carrier. >>> and cold case. the fbi can't crack this code. >>> and cold case. the fbi can't crack this code. can you? captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning, everybody. thanks for joining us today, i'm betty nguyen. we begin in libya, where cia operatives have been on the ground gathering intelligence, and making contact with rebel forces. the rebel troops are being pushed back by libyan forces, losing about 100 miles in two days. meanwhile, a key adviser to moammar gadhafi has resigned amid some international intrigue. joel brown is in washington. good morning, joel. bring us up to speed. >> a lot going on, betty. good morning to you. we're learning now the cia's been on the ground in libya for weeks now, in some cases working hand in hand with the rebels. but whether or not to supply weapons to the opposition is a whole other matter that sparks fierce debate here in washington. cia operatives are reportedly on the ground in libya. the intelligence agency sent in small teams earlier this
developments on two big stories. is the u.s. preparing to bomb libya? the u.n.'s major decision to protect libyan civilians from the gadhafi regime. >>> and also the race to stop a nuclear disaster in japan. today's desperate emergency action to stop an all outright meltdown. it is friday, march 18th. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm peggy bunker. >> and i'm rob nelson. >>> military action against libya could happen in just a matter of hours. meanwhile, moammar gadhafi's son interviewed exclusively with abc news is now responding and is as defiant as ever. >>> and as nuclear crisis escalates in japan, the west coast of the united states is now on alert already monitoring radiation levels there. >> it's funny, too, because they say they have those monitors up already. in seattle, your hometown, will be the first place to know if a wave does hit us. >> and the epa will be watching that closely. that's for sure. >>> we do begin with the dramatic decision to take military action in libya. the u.n. security council voted just hours ago. >> and now the u.s., france, britain and other countries ar
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
. and in about 45 minutes, former u.s. comp then, political strategist maria cardona and john feehery and we will discuss the arab world with a former u.s. ambassador to morocco, marc ginsburg. on this channel, "washington journal" is next, live with your phone calls. later today, we will give you a brown paper -- roundtable that will include the mayor of boston, st. paul, the minnesota, green though, mississippi, and sacramento, california. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] host: the video on your screen is some of the latest footage on the air raids in libya, courtesy of the aljazeera network. with the president act in town, questions are being raised about u.s. policy and goals in libya. that is our discussion this morning on the "washington journal" as we go through the newspapers. what do you think? how is the president handling the libya conflict so far? 202 is the area code -- how do you think the president is handling the libyan conflict. yesterday speaker john boehner sent this letter to the president. speaker boehner list several questions he asks the question
milliliters at once. they are facing up to 8,000 times that. that is more radiation than a u.s. work wore face in a career and what experts consider lethal. people sent tributes via tweets. one man wrote whatever the closest equivalent of a noble pride they deserve that and more. these are likely men with wives, children facing their own perils outside the zone. they wait and watch from afar and worry. >> their dedication to their country and work and fellow person is really demonstrated a willingness to work through the trying conditions to protect both the country of japan and their fellow citizens. >> rescue specialists arrived in japan today. they came from the united states, britain and china. local officials welcomed them with heartfelt appreciation. >> thank you very much. i would like to express our thanks. >> the teams break into small groups to begin search for tsunami victims moving on only after marking the spots they have checked for any signs of life. >> the first time we have been able to see anything. to be honest, it will be a very long job and big job for them and we will do
. >> thank you. britain says it will be hosting a summit in london next week. progress on the u.s. mandate intervention in libya. the u.s. military said there is no indication that coalition air strikes resulted in any civilian casualties. wednesday night, sites again or targeted in the capital of tripoli. bobby gaddafi -- gaddafi's tanks in israel were hit. schelling's have resumed. >> a propaganda war is also being waged in libya. brandishing, a presenter on libyan state television pledged to give his last breath for libyan leader gaddafi. state television also broadcast images of gaddafi's supporters staging demonstrations and gaddafi himself making a brief public appearance for the first time in days. speaking from his compound, gaddafi pledged victory, denouncing what he called the unjustified aggression of crusader nations. although the united nations- backed strike had forced his troops to retreat, battles are still waiting on the ground. rebels and regime forces are still fighting for controleastee been engaged in a standoff for days. the u.s. president says intervention would not
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
traffic control procedures. u.s. transportation secretary ray lahood calling for at least two air traffic controllers now to man overnight shifts. this after a controller at d.c.'s reagan national airport reportedly fell asleep and two planes couldn't get in touch with the tower after mid night just trying to land. both had to go in for a landing on their own. toes your headlines. >> five hour energy ran out and two planes had to do their own thing. >> i'm sure nothing's down there on the runway. let's cross our fingers. let's talk a little bit about what's going on right now. in libya, new video just in, one of qaddafi's bases reportedly destroyed by u.s. coalition air strikes. look at these pictures, showing a flaming wreckage overnight and qaddafi's compound in tripoli also reportedly targeted again and was struck. the commander of britain's royal air force says libya's air force no longer exists. >> so now that we also have an exclusive story that came to us, i think james rosen and jennifer griffin working on this together. essentially, there might be some break as we try to find o
. >> you were reporting this on "world news" last night. more missile strikes for the u.s. and allies against libya. now there is growing concern over how gadhafi will respond and whether he'll make good on his threat of terrorism. >>> and the latest from japan this morning. officials there saying the death toll now tops 18,000 this morning. an incredible number. and new concerns about radiation. contaminating, not only the tap water, but the vegetables there and seafood. we'll have a live report from the quake zone. >>> and in this country, a spring roared in california. snow, ice, rock slides shutting down major highways this morning. sam is standing by with the very latest on that. >> the first full day of spring, david. >>> let's get right to libya. and the latest actions by the u.s. and its allies. french fighter jets for the third day in a row, headed to libya. we have a team of correspondents, covering all of the angles this morning, starting with martha raddatz, in washington where she's been reporting all through the night. >> reporter: good morning, robin. the strikes have t
as the chief science officer at the u.s. antidoping agency. >>> the man who confessed to killing chauncey bailey will return to the witness stand monday. devontae broussard is a key witness against the two men accused of plotting the killing. in court yesterday he talked about committing other crimes for bay. broussard's credibility is key to the prosecution's case. he is supposed to detail bailey's killing next week. >>> the threat of a nuclear disaster in japan is heating up gain. we have the latest on the new danger today. there is news about the job situation in california. we have information on whether it is getting better or worse. and meteorologist mark tamayo will be back with more on what you can expect for the weekend weather. >> why cafe hayward is popular for more than just its coffee and doughnuts. [ female announcer why choose between delicious or 100 calories? ♪ with yoplait delights, now you can finally have both. ♪ it's the perfect parfait, with two indulgently rich layers of chocolate and raspberry yogurt and only 100 calories. yoplait delights. get rid of the "or."
>> i'm sydnie kohara. the u.s. sending airplanes to japan for americans who want to get out of the country. the fukushima nuclear complex in danger of a meltdown. let's go to charlie d'agata in japan. good morning, charlie. >> reporter: we are trying to make our way towards the quake zone. the japanese military has taken over control of the highways for humanitarian aid. we are going to try to get as close as we can. we're cutting through the mountains, you can see the snow, while trying to avoid at all costs getting near the nuclear power plant. >>> reporter: military helicopters launched an all-out water assault on japan's crippled nuclear power plant in a desperate attempt to buy more time. crews are racing to finish a new power line that could restore crucial water pumps, the best options many experts say to cool dangerously hot reactor and prevent a nuclear meltdown. >> we believe that radiation levels are extremely high which could possibly impact the ability to take corrective measures. >> reporter: the biggest worry is reactor 4. wednesday u.s. officials warned the u
gadhafi is under increased pressure from u.s. and international leaders, american warships on their way as a show of force. and questions about gadhafi's mental status following an interview he gave to christiane amanpour, first interview to reporters since the uprising began. >> they love me, all. >> reporter: if they do love you -- >> they will die to pro pekt me, my people. >> reporter: if you say they do love you, then why are they capturing bengazi -- >> it is al qaeda, it is al qaeda, not my people. al qaeda, yes. >> now, he laughed off the idea that he would ever leave libya, asking why would i leave my homeland? >>> in washington, u.s. ambassador to the united nations says gadhafi's comments seem, quote, delusional and some strong reaction among the opposition forces in libya who have taken over the city of benghazi. alex marquardt reports. >> reporter: this is hatred for gadhafi. the react to the interview with christiane amanpour ranged from disbelief to fury. >> everybody, even he lies, he knows he's lying and he knows people listening to him are aware he's lying. >> reporter
worse snow? germany. a big freeze in france. in the u.s., the worst blizzards of the decades. but despite all of that, but despite of all that, their economies grew in the fourth quarter. and while our growth has worsened, theirs have improved. the german economy -- the chancellor -- the chancellor should just calm down just a little bit, mr. deputy speaker. the german economy is forecast to grow more strongly than it was last year. so is the united states. growth in the world economy has been revised up. but which is the major country downgrading its growth forecast, the united kingdom. mr. deputy speaker, it's not the wrong type of snow to blame. it's the wrong type of chancellor. it's the wrong type of chancellor in the wrong type of government with the wrong priorities for britain. mr. deputy speaker, mr. deputy speaker -- >> courtesy should be shown but can i say to everybody, the public also wants to hear what the opposition has got to say. if the cabinet members do not want to listen, then please leave the chair. some people may agree, some may disagree. the opposition
to be qaddafi's presidential compound. still, both the brits and the u.s. military leaders say qaddafi is not the target of this mission. >> this is not about going -- going after qaddafi himself or attacking him at this particular point in time. it's about achieving these narrow and relatively limited objectives so that he stops killing his people and so humanitarian support can be provided. >> still, certainly it is sys m symbolic to the libyan leader can hit his home. our defense secretary says the u.s. role in this effort should begin to diminish. >> we expect that in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we will be a member of the coalition. we will have a military role in the coalition. but we will not have the pre-eminent role. >> admiral mullin says that support role will include intelligence support, jamming capabilities and assistance with the overall mission and the no-fly zone. back to you guys in new york. >> thanks for setting the table. john kerry, seniator sessions, admiral mullin, e
to remove gadhafi from power using military force. instead top u.s. officials are working diplomatic channels to try and push the dictator o. hiarcltoonme t a very clear message to gadhafi, but we're also sending a message to people around him. do you really want to be a pariah? do you really want to end up in the international criminal court? now is your time to get out of this and to help change the direction. >> mike viqueira, good sunday morning to you. >> reporter: good morning action al alex. >> what else are we hearing? >> reporter: critics say there's something of a mixed message coming from the administration since the military action started a week ago yesterday. it's not only republicans, it's democrats as well. the administration on the one hand has a need to play to the arab street, but they're also now trying to play to main street here in the united states. they have emphasized all along that this is an international coalition that includes arab nations. at one point secretary clinton said we are not in the lead but clearly the united states has been in the lead. they
. the radiation has now reached southern california. but the u.s. officials are saying it's a billion times beneath the levels that would threaten anyone's health. japanese officials raised the fukushima accident level from four to five. that means they consider it on par with our own three mile island incident. frantic efforts continue to con taint situation at the daiichi plant. the u.s. military says japan requested an unmanned high altitude reconnaissance aircraft to fly over the troubled plant. that drone is equipped with infrared sensors that can take pictures and get a better understanding what's happening inside the reactor. >>> getting aid to northeastern japan has finally gotten easier. the port of sendai partially reopened. a ship brought in a large container of supplies for hundreds of thousands of people living in shelters. a small measure now of comfort exactly a week after the disaster struck. >>> a week ago today, people rushed out of buildings as a magnitude 9.0 earthquake hit. amateur video shows scenes of homes inside, while outside a tsunami brought its own terror, sweep
in libya. how big of a role will the u.s. play now? are we still in charge? and with war fatigue setting in and criticism from both sides of the aisle, when does the president fully explain what's perhaps, monday or tuesday of next week. >>> plus, fear of spreading terrorism. there were anti-government demonstrations today and in some cases violence in many arab countries, including yemen. thousands turned out calling for the ouster of a u.s. ally. if the president is overthrown, who stops al qaeda in the arabian peninsula from taking over? >>> and there are increasing concerns of spreading radiation from the crippled power plant in japan with even more people now being encouraged to get out of the area, but not ordered. how great is that danger? >>> plus, a little politics with hispanics now making up one of our every six americans and one out of every four children, by the way, how long can republicans be seen as hostile to their interests? the huge implications of the census report on the 2012 presidential election. and finally, what's the more serious candidates to do? how does anyon
be harmful here in the united states or any of the u.s. territories. i will turn it over to dan then. >> thank you and good morning. we have continued working very hard in consultation with our great friends and strong allies in japan, as they've come to terms and wrestled with this challenging situation. most of you know that our equipment that we sent over to support them has arrived on a c-17. we sent a team of 33 additional people which were in addition to the six people we already had out there in japan. they had over 17,000 pounds of equipment with them. they've unpacked that. they've taken the two pods that do the aerial measurement of ground depositions and mounted them, one on a fixed-wing aircraft and one on a helicopter and we flew those aircraft on their first missions. we've been collecting information as they've come back. we're in the process of sharing that information with our japanese hosts and while that's still being looked at, preliminary indications are that they're consistent with the recommendations that came down from the nuclear regulatory commission. so ind
. clearly they need help but u.s. defense secretary says countries other than the u.s. can step in with training. robert gates is on capitol hill amid new revelations of cia people gathering facts and cultivating contacts on the battlefield. here's a bit of what he told the house arms services committee. >> i can't speak to any cia activities but i will tell you that the president has been quite clear that in terms of the united states military, there will be no boots on the ground. >> now i want to show you a libyan city that's far from rebel territory but a battleground in every sense. misrata, which we've already mentioned there in yellow. almost from the start of this uprising, misrata has been under siege from government tank, artillery, even snipers. an independent reporting has been all but impossible in fact we don't even know who controls misrata anywhere but cnn's frederik pleitgen managed to enter the city yesterday and when he found, well you will have to see from yourself. fred, joins us from a ship not far from the misrata port. fred, tell us about your odyssey the
's not going to change. but it seems that the u.s. is trying to do a last-ditch effort to prevent a slaughter in benghazi. and saif gadhafi said, don't bomb us. it was very strange. listen to what he said. >> we want, even americans, to help us get rid of the remnants of those people and have a peaceful country. we want you to help us 20, you know, middle east democracy. more freedom. being peaceful. but not to threaten us with air strikes. we will not be afraid. >> and he said whatever happens is not going to cause his father to leave office. >> but i couldn't help but when we were listening with george. if you're waking up this morning and you hear that his father is considering shooting down passenger planes. american passenger planes. is he serious about that? >> well, the defense minister made that threat. and they did do lockerbie. they've taken admission for it. they do do that. clearly, one of the things that happens is you have to be prepared for some kind of retaliation. and they're threatening terrorism. >> what's your gut here? >> the gut is they don't have significant air defense
. >> thank you, jade. >>> we're also monitoring a briefing happening right now in washington, d.c. now, u.s. nuclear experts are part of the briefing. we're gone bring you their analysis. there you see a live picture. we'll bring you their latest analysis coming up at 7:30. >>> 7:50. today, japan's prime minister in a national tv address called on the japanese people to reunite in rebuilding the country from scratch. also today, japan increased the alert of its nuclear crisis from level 4 to level 5 on a scale of 7. fire trucks sprayed water on overheated reactors at the nuclear plant again today, trying to prevent a meltdown and there's still -- they are still frantically trying to install a power line to the plant, hoping to get the cooling systems working again. it's now been exactly one week since the disastrous quake and tsunami rocked japan. several hours ago, survivors all across that country marked this tragedy with a moment of silence. >>> and the death toll from the japanese quake and tsunami disaster keeps climbing to staggering levels. the latest casualty numbers show 6500 are c
complain about u.s. policy. but he went a step further. he went on to demand the release in the united states of five convicted criminals, five people who were convicted in the united states in a country where we have due process, we have all the rights and all the rights that are provided to a defendant. five people who were convicted ofes upon yadge and one convicted of conspiracy to commit murder. former president carter did, did ask that those convicted in a court of law with all the due process that we have in this country for conspiracy to commit murder, he did ask and demand for their release, but did not ask or demand for the release of hundreds and hundreds of political providers who are rotting in prison while he was there. it's a sad day, mr. speaker. it's a sad day, i think for humanity. i know a lot of people who are listening are not surprised. i recall when the cuban dictator was gravely ill, it was reported that president carter wrote him a nice note hoping he would recover, hoping he would recover and would recover his health. and that now, again, former president cart
said in a potential intervention would come with regret. u.s. and allied forces meeting in paris to talk about potential military action. president obama said yesterday that the united states will take part in a no-flight effort. -- no-fly effort. we want to get your thoughts on the u.s. joined the no-fly effort. here is how you can contribute this morning. here iare the numbers at the bottom of your screen. the president announcing yesterday in a statement about the united states supporting a no-fly zone. this has been done by several allies. we will take a look at the headlines on "washington journal" this morning. mr. obama sketched out an american military role. -- rule. you have probably seen other headlines this morning as well. meetings are going on to talk about the strategy with the united states and other allied forces. the president made the statement yesterday about joining the no- fly zone effort. he spoke about what the united states will not do. here is what he had to say. >> i want to be clear about what we will not be doing. the united states is not going to depl
that more people had died in the villa, at what point does the u.s. say that now we are going to do something? how many people have to die? how many threats to their need to be to our energy needs? >> jake, i would simply say -- and remind you -- when you say that this has been a couple of weeks already, that is a remarkably short period of time from the time when colonel gaddafi was perceived to be, and was, in control of his country to the point where the international community is imposing substantial and punishing sanctions on him and his regime. the international community, speaking with one voice, calling for him to step down and cease the violence against his own people. we are talking about a matter of days and weeks that this has transpired within. i am aware of the ongoing violence. as the president just did with australia, we are again calling on the libyan regime to stoppin the in humane, brutal, unacceptable assaults on its own people. and for colonel gaddafi to step aside, as he has lost legitimacy in the eyes of his people and the world. >> i was not -- i was talking
and artillery and at the same time u.s. officials cautioned the united states and allies intend to limit their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think o
" -- one-on-one. abc's christiane amanpour gets answers from moammar gadhafi in a u.s. exclusive. >> he insists the libyan people do not oppose him, that they love him. it's tuesday, march 1st. >> announcer: from abc news, this is "world news now." >>> good morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> i'm peggy bunker. >>> moammar gadhafi's comments led to instant outrage from the white house and worldwide as opposition forces take down another libyan city. >> that interview is remarkable. it's like he has no real grasp what's happening outside his own -- >> his own mind, no comprehension of what's going on in the world, really. >> it really is a startling interview. stay tuned for that. >>> also ahead, convicted swindler bernie madoff's first recorded interview from prison. what he says about the billions lost and what has brought him to tears. some troubling things in terms of what he doesn't acknowledge even to this day. >> the lack of empathy for a lot of people watching that interview. >>> also coming up later, the smartphone app that helped a young driver beat a speeding ticket. see how
in the downfall of the soviet union. but speaking as an engineer, i'm proud to say a lot of u.s. navy personnel stepped up to the plate right after the three mile island accident and improved safety of the nuclear system in the united states. the design of that nuclear reactor at three mile island was much, much better than at chernobyl. >> we have 31 designed nuclear plants in the united states that are similar to the one over at fukushima right now, the one causing the great concern right now. do you think we have a better backup system than they do? they don't have a good one, because it was undermined by the tsunami. it affected the battery backup to the diesel system, none of it worked. they ended up putting in seawater, which is destroying their plant, as an extreme measure. how are we in that regard? in terms of nuclear diesel backup, battery backup, do we have all these backup systems? >> we do. and there are parts of the united states and california where there are two nuclear plants at diablo canyon and san aknow frey where concerns have been raised about size eismic activity. in
taliban situation for the u.s. what is the worst case scenario? >> libya has been very strong having its young men go overseas to fight in islamic insurgency, balkans, chechnya, especially ir rack when the height of the fighting was there. those that don't get killed go home. i think the core of the resistance, whatever little military ability they have is probably made up by people elsewhere we would call mujahadeen. so it's a dicey proposition to be getting involved with this. i'm not sure that the opposition, if it takes power, is going to be much better than was gadhafi. >> that's why you need to have the cia, i presume, in there vetting, as we said, who are these people? who are the elements funding or supporting them? who are politically the most palatable and least palatable among them, the white house saying no decision has been made. i have a question for you as a cia veteran, i guess. the fact that we even know about this, is that unusual? should where he just assume the cia in this sort of situation would, of course, be in there on the ground? >> you have to assume the preside
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